Those firm, strong, shapely upper arms that are on the top of many women’s wish lists may seem elusive. As we age, or if we have lost weight, the upper arm area can become saggy and the dreaded ‘batwing’ arm sets in. So, how do we beat the batwing and achieve those tight, taught arms? Depending on your body and lifestyle, one of the following may be the answer.

Exercise

Makes sense that the best thing you can do to get your upper arms in shape is exercise. While spot reduction has be proven to be a myth, there are three key exercises that are essential to shapely arms. They aren’t much fun, but they can be the difference between flab and fab. Of course, before you undertake any fitness or exercise regime you should consult your GP.

Push ups:

Lay face down on the floor, with your feet about 15-20 centimetres apart. Place your palms on the ground, just a bit wider than shoulder-width apart, and with your toes on the floor supporting your lower body, lift your whole body off the floor with your arms until they are fully extended. Bend your arms at the elbows and lower your chest to the floor, stopping about 10cm from the ground, keeping your back and legs straight. Then lift yourself back up to the original position. If you want to make it easier, put your knees on the floor rather than your toes.

How many? Fitness experts suggest if you are only just starting, aim for five a day for the first week, then 10 a day for the second week, and so on until you are doing 25 a day.

Lateral or side raises

Grab a couple of dumbbells, one in each hand. With your arms by your side (elbows slightly bent, palms facing in) stand up with your knees bent slightly. Raise your arms out to the sides until the dumbbells are level with shoulders (palms facing the floor).
Lower your arms.
How many? Fitness experts suggest if you are only just starting, aim for 10 a day for the first week, then 25 a day for the second week, and so on until you are doing 50 a day.

Overhead Extension

Grab one dumbbell with both hands. Standing, place your feet hip-width apart with your knees slightly bent.
Raise your arms in front until they are overhead, with your wrists straight. Bend your elbows until the dumbbell is behind your head.
How many? Fitness experts suggest if you are only just starting, aim for 10 a day for the first week, then 25 a day for the second week, and so on until you are doing 50 a day.

Diet

Watching what you eat will also have a positive impact on those upper arms. Adding more fibre (such as fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains) to your diet can help you lose excess body fat. And make sure you are getting plenty of protein too, to promote muscle growth.

Fake it

Did you know there are arm corsets? Yup, just the same as you can hold in your tummy or smooth your thighs, if you feel your arms are letting down your favourite new outfit, there are a range of arm shapers, in various guises. In fact, when Marks & Spencer launched its range of Flatter Me Armwear – known as Spanx for the arms – they sold out in hours.

Surgery

If you have tried diet and exercise, and those tuckshop arms just won’t budge, there is a surgical answer. It’s called brachiaplasty (also known as an arm lift or arm reduction). Brachiaplasty removes excess skin and fat from your upper arm. The procedure is tailored to your body. Plastic surgeons worldwide are reporting a surge in the popularity of brachiaplasty.

The standard brachiaplasty incision extends from the underarm to the elbow; however the full length incision is not always necessary. During a skin tightening procedure, you may also need liposuction if you have excess fatty deposits, for an overall firmer look. This will be decided in your initial consultation.

For a free brachiaplasty consultation with our surgical nurses, contact us using the form below or call 1300 007 30

Any surgical or invasive procedure carries risks. Before proceeding, you should seek a second opinion from an appropriately qualified health practitioner.

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